When we were children, we loved climbing trees and play in the forest. The forest provided us with joy, freedom, and mysteries. We ran with it, rolled in it, climbed in it and made up thousands of stories on our way. When our parents threw us out to play, we went to the forest where our imagination could roam freely. The scenery in itself posed hundreds of stories, and playmates grew out from all the rocks, plants, roots and trees we could find.

As we grew older, we discovered the world of music and circus, which provided us with a lot of the same qualities as the forest. And with a paycheck in our hands as well. There we refined our play skills, imagination, and physical capacities.

After working on theatre stages, circus halls, tents and concert stages for years, we grew tired of staying inside. We taught it was time to go back to the forest and take the audience with us.

Contact: info@knekkegreine.com

More info: www.knekkegreine.com

On stage: 4 artists or more, of the following cast: Mira Leonard, Esmeralda Nikolajeff, Love Kjellsson, Karoline Aamås, Hege Eriksdatter Østefjells, Rebecca Seward, Elise Bjerkelund Reine

Colleagues/Collaborators: Sara Erlingsdotter and many more.

Duration: Between 45minutes and 3 hours.
Normal version 1,5 hours.

Audience: Can be adjusted for different audiences, depending on space and conditions. Recommended for families and maximum 25 persons. Can be adjusted for bigger audiences.

Space: Forest. Approximately 500×500 area in beautiful forest without paths. Optional version is along a path.

Written about Knekke Greine

”Already from the start of the performance my fantasy starts to spin, a beautiful forest spirit lures us further and further into the wild. It tells the story about the communication between humans, trees and stones.”
-Audience post on facebook

“Stones awake and forest spirits make rope climbing art. With Knekke Greine, ’The North Mountain’ received enchanted life. In the performance the forest is alive in many ways. It gets dangerous and mysterious, as in childrens game and in folklore.” -Sundsvalls Tidning